48 Hours in Jxn

Spending a couple of days in the City With Soul? Jackson has no shortage of noteworthy food, music, and cultural destinations.

a dinosaur sekelton in a museum
MS Museum of Natural Science

Only have 24 hours? Check out our one day itinerary

Diving Into Jackson’s Art, History, and Culture

Start off the day at the LeFleur Museum District. Located at the junction of I-55 and Lakeland Drive, the area’s four museums offer limitless fun and wonder for the whole family.

Get up close and personal with catfish and alligators at the Mississippi Museum of Natural Science, and explore a living-history farm modeled after a historical 1920s cotton-economy-era town at the Mississippi Agriculture & Forestry Museum. At the Mississippi Children's Museum, fun awaits for kids and adults alike at the Exploring Mississippi and World At Work exhibits, while sports fans can pay homage to their favorite players at the Mississippi Sports Hall of Fame & Museum.

a modern bar
Gold Coast Bar at Cultivation Food Hall

Sip, Shop & Savor

Feeling famished after your museum tours? The District at Eastover offers family-friendly, casual dining options, including Italian fare at Sal & Mookie's, and fresh, multi-cultural menus at Cultivation Food Hall.

If you’re seeking a more intimate atmosphere to enjoy a quick bite, trek a little further north to Canton Mart Square’s Crazy Cat Eat Up, which takes the best of traditional Southern home cooking and puts a creative, fresh spin on the menu. When you’re finished, pop by the nearby Haven Curated Home, The Book Rack, and View Gallery to find your own treasure to take home.

a plate of burger, fries and onion rings
The No. 7 burger at Lou's Full Serv
Credit: Ben Hon

Bites, Brews & BBQ

In the historic Fondren District, snap a photo in front of Scott Allen's "Together We Are Fondren” murals, located behind Fondren Village shopping center. Then, slide over to the barbecue and brew-centric The Pig & Pint.

After some Instagram-worthy mural selfies, grab Happy Hour drinks at Historic Belhaven’s The Manship, Elvie’s (both with impressive light fare and cocktail menus inspired by Southern favorites with a cozy atmosphere) or the new Fertile Ground Beer Co. If you’re looking to extend the rest of your evening eats, Lou’s Full-Serv serves up "Southern-rooted," elevated plates and cocktails in a rustic setting.

the Woolworth counter recreation
Smith Robertson Museum & Cultural Center
Credit: Drew Dempsey/The Tell Agency

Exploring the Capital City’s Rich African-American Culture

Take a tour through the Historic Farish Street District, which was known as the cultural and business center of Jackson's black community up until the 1970s. Now, the area is experiencing a revival while maintaining many of its notable landmarks.

Running from Amite Street across to Fortification Street and Mill Street to Lamar Street, the district is full of historic homes and buildings, including the Scott Ford Houses, built in 1891 and 1892 by the formerly enslaved Mary Green Scott and her daughter, Virginia Ford. Other celebrated African-American sites include The Alamo Theatre and the Smith Robertson Museum & Cultural Center, which was the first museum dedicated to the African-American experience in Mississippi.

Walking around calls for putting your feet up and enjoying a leisurely meal. Get a famous pig ear slider (trust us, it's good!) at the Big Apple Inn or Southwestern egg rolls at Johnny T's Bistro & Blues.

Finish out your visit with a drive down to Jackson State University to experience the Margaret Walker Center. Founded in 1968 by famous author and poet Margaret Walker, the center houses archives dedicated to the African-American experience and history at J's historic Ayer Hall.

a view from the balcony over diners at tables with live music on the stage
Iron Horse Grill

Music Nights In Mississippi

Food and music? That’s a winning dinner combo that we’ll take a bite out of. Located in the historic Armour Smokehouse c.1906, The Iron Horse Grill is the perfect dinner stop with its homage to Mississippi's heritage through inspired menus, music, and promoting shared times with friends and family.

After chowing down on Southern-inspired bites, take a walk down the state's musical memory lane in the attached Mississippi Music Experience. An ode to Americana music and culture, the in-house museum features lifelike wax statues of famous Mississippi and African-American musicians by artist Anne Robin Luckett, plus an impressive collection of memorabilia. To keep the party going, grab a nightcap at F. Jones Corner and enjoy a late-night blues performance by regional musicians.

Anne Marie Fowler

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Anne Marie Fowler